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Switzerland approves paid paternity leave of two weeks for new fathers.

Based on a new mandate by Swiss Parliament, new fathers are now eligible for compensated paternity leave for up to two weeks. This statutory mandate began implementation on January 1st, 2021, and is funded by income compensation allowances (APG). Employees granted this leave are eligible for up to 80% of their gross monthly pay up to CHF 196 per day.

Eligible employees can take a maximum of 10 days of paternity leave, and can take it either in the form of:

  • Single work days (10 days max); or
  • A period of two weeks (14 days).

The maximum total number of daily allowances is 14, regardless of which form the leave is taken in, and it must be taken within six months of a child’s birth. This provision excludes leave to the biological father of a child whose mother has remarried and leave for adoption.

Employer Considerations:

The APG (optional income insurance reduction due to service or maternity) contribution rate will be raised from 0.45% to 0.50% of the employee’s gross salary. This will impose additional costs upon the employer. Relevant employment contracts must be revised accordingly.

The information shared in this article provides general information only, and not professional advice. If you need to consult on international expansion of your business or have specific questions about local policy compliance, contact us today to speak to one of our experts.

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